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government that any powerful weapon will be secured and destroyed. tois our response ability determine whether this can be done that ensures arms will not fall into terrorist organizations. i'm encouraged the syrian opposition chose the prime minister for exile yesterday. time is of the essence. there are difficult decisions that must be made in the days and weeks ahead. we continue to push for un security council resolution. do we provide military advisers and training? do we provide direct military assistance? if so, what kind? can assad be pushed to accept any negotiated conflict? the use of chemical weapons -- makes this more pressing. the use of chemical weapons by this regime would be horrific. 70,000 slaughtered syrians is terrific. horrific. the discussions we have in this committee are interesting. the fact that this is hard cannot stop us from acting. you and your colleagues know better than anyone there are no easy answers. inaction is not an option. i look forward to your testimony and i yield back. thank you. >> thank you. three minutes to the chairman of the middle east s
control over a fractious government? or is it all those things? this is not a discussion rooted in the past. we will not relive the wmd questions. we will not dwell on the mistakes of the coalition authority, and we will not debate the surge. we will look at iraq today and where it is headed. a has been little of that in the 10 years media coverage, even though it is a far more relevant question for policy makers and the public today. with that, because you did not come here to hear me today, that we introduce the plan all. all on the who they are.-- know who they are. you know their contributions to the efforts to stabilize iraq. to my right is ambassador ryan crocker, who is the kissinger senior fellow at the el sity. sal.-- yale univer he has served recently as our ambassador to afghanistan, his long career included ambassadors for iraq as well as our ambassador to pakistan, syria, kuwait, and lebanon. from may to august of 2003, he served as the government's director for the coalition provisional authority in baghdad, and his career in the foreign service included a tour in
government would be with peace toward the palestinians. let me be clear -- israel remains fully committed to peace and to the solution of a .wo state for two peoples we extend our hands in peace and friendship to the palestinian people. i hope that your visit him along with the visit of the secretary of state kerry help us turn a page in relations with the palestinians. let us sit down at the negotiating table. let us work together to achieve the historic compromise that will end our conflict once and for all. let me conclude on a personal note. i know how valuable the time and energy is of the american president, yourself. this is the 10th time we have met since you became president and since i became prime minister. you have chosen israel is your fort and then you -- venue your foreign visit and your second term. thank you for the investment you have made in our relationship and in strengthening that friendship and alliance between our two countries. it is deeply appreciated. you have come here on the eve of passover. i've always considered it it as our most cherished holiday. it celebr
. there are issues relating to the ,oss of proprietary information if they share it with the federal government. we're working through those. there is legislation pending to address this. if we are to be successful in this realm, we have to develop mechanisms telling information between the private sector and the federal enclave in order to anticipate and prevent cyber attack and then identify those responsible for the attacks and to make certain that they go to jail or otherwise. >> thank you. and thank you mr. chairman. there are questions about what can be done now and what can be done if we have the legislation theif we don't have information in the legislation, are we preventing you from the partnerships with the private sector. but we will save that for another day. thank you very much. [inaudible] i've heard there's a growing concern about gangs pin the u.s. military. does d.o.t. participate in this gang intelligence center in and do they have access to the data as a tool to prevent gang recruited in the military? >> i would have to check as to what is their commitment of personnel assigned
of the state legislatures, governor's mansions, and there's a difference between state government and the federal government. the absurdity in a state capital, that we did not have a budget for three years, yet here in washington the senate did not pass a budget for three years and the president just not serious about what americans think is the biggest problem of that country. they do not even have a budget for three years? state government, closer to the people, has to get things done. i used to tell trent lott, the difference between governors and senators is senators talk about doing things and governors do things. there's a lot of truth to democrat governors as well. their party is so committed to washington that you do not see many of these governors who are willing to talk the way republican governors are about how we do a better job at the state level. there's much more bipartisanship. i like to think i had a relative success will governorship, but eight of my eight years of governor, i have a democrat house majority, and seven of my years, i had a democrat senate majority
. havenk a great many of us very deep concerns about the government collecting .nformation on the citizenry with the ease and availability of drones i think there is a real concern the day-to-day conduct of american citizens going about their business might be monitored, catalog and recorded by the federal government. i would have very deep concerns about that. question, do you share those concerns? if so, what reasonable limitations should be considered to protect the privacy rights of all americans? >> i think any time when you come up with a new surveillance technology will have instances where the technology catches bad actors doing bad things. those few instances are at the expense of constant surveillance of all citizens as they go about their daily life is not consistent with the daily protection of the -- daily constitutional protections and what our country was built upon. i think we need to prevent police patrols or driving up and down the street collecting all sorts of information about theviduals supplemented by facial recognition technology. i think we need to enforce a require
. there are issues relating to the loss of the proprietary information, if they share it with the federal government. we are working through those but if we are to be successful in this realm, we have to develop mechanisms of channeling information between the thought -- between the private sector and federal enclave to participate and the bedside attacks and identify those responsible for those attacks and to make certain they are deterred from the additional attacks. >> thank you. it seems it is a question what can be done now and if this are you really from a good relationship with the private sector? thank you bear much. >> i have heard this is a growing concern about gangs in the u.s. military. does the dod participate in the national gang intelligence center? >> i would have to check to the the personnel assigned. i do know that we were work -- we work cooperatively with the military to address things that may be on the feet and also in the military. particularly in cases where there is indication the gang activity is not mullah gated to just the community -- is not relegated just to the commu
's a vision of the country where the government is indifferent to the suffering of many while only paying attention to the demands of a few. then there is the other plan that is before us, the democratic plan. with a balanced set of priorities, a better vision for the future, found in the budget offered by house budget committee ranking member chris van hollen. it takes a balanced approach with targeted spending and new revenues. it would cut waste, add jobs and spur economic growth of the economy. it would reduce the deficit by an additional $1.8 trillion without jeopardizing the recovery or harming the middle class. it includes $1.2 trillion in new revenue obtained not by tax increases but by closing loopholes and eliminating wasteful spending that benefits the wealthiest americans and the largest corporations. it eliminates $4 billion in annual tax breaks to the oil and gas industry, an industry that is making profits. they don't need a tax break. in fact, they're making enormous profits. so, why does the ryan budget give them a government subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infras
of the government in the country had a very slender record of success and that iraq had none of the characteristics that would lead to success in such a venture. third, the argument was being made that it would trigger a tsunami of democratic transformation across the region, was at best a faith based argument. you were not there in 2002, but later you became a very strong critic of this effort. what was it that changed your mind, that led you to make the arguments you did in the mid- 2000's? >> i remember vividly the night when the war commenced. i was asked by the pbs news to be there. i remember vividly all of a sudden the news came that major explosions are taking place in baghdad, that baghdad is under air assault, and that the war had begun. i had such a sick feeling in my stomach. i said to myself, i just hope to god that we now find those weapons of mass destruction, because that was the reason why the war was started. i was already by then conscious of the fact that there was a deliberate confusion in terminology used by the administration to justify the initiation of hostilities. for the
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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